I am a professionally trained historian with a PhD in American Studies from Brown University. My specialties are 20th century American culture, the history of feminism and the history of gender and sexuality in modern America. Desiring Revolution (2001) and The Dinner Party (2013) explore the history of 1970s “cultural” feminism, with its controversial prioritization of women’s unique biological and psychological experiences.

dinner-partyJudy Chicago’s monumental art installation The Dinner Party was an immediate sensation when it debuted in 1979, and today it is considered the most popular work of art to emerge from the second-wave feminist movement. Jane F. Gerhard examines the piece’s popularity to understand how ideas about feminism migrated from activist and intellectual circles into the American mainstream in the last three decades of the twentieth century.
 


 

desiring revolutionThere was a moment in the 1970s when sex was what mattered most to feminists. White middle-class women viewed sex as central to both their oppression and their liberation. Young women started to speak and write about the clitoris, orgasm, and masturbation, and publishers and the news media jumped at the opportunity to disseminate their views. In Desiring Revolution, Gerhard asks why issues of sex and female pleasure came to matter so much to these “second-wave feminists.” In answering this question Gerhard reveals the diverse views of sexuality within feminism and shows how the radical ideas put forward by this generation of American women was a response to attempts to define and contain female sexuality going back to the beginning of the century.
 


 
A chronological survey of the role and experience of women in American history, Women and the Making of America examines the issue of power in women’s lives and women’s history. Examining relationships between men and women as well as the diverse experiences of different women, the book explores how women were central to the making of America’s history.